@NYTimes obits: 108 males, 46 females

Today, July 14, there were 3 male and 0 female featured obituaries in the New York Times. Yesterday, July 13, there were 1 male and 1 female features obituaries in the NYT.  Since I started tracking it here, that is 108 males featured and 46 females featured.

(I started tracking the obits here on May 14, but I’ve missed days when on travel. This is the New Mexico version of the NYT – I don’t know if the obits published vary by region.)

@NYTimes obits: 97 males, 44 females

Today, July 10, there were 4 male and 0 female featured obituaries in the New York Times. Catching up – on July 9 it was 0 male and 2 female, July 8 was 2 male and 0 female.  Since I started tracking it here, that is 97 males featured and 44 females featured.

(I started tracking the obits here on May 14, but I’ve missed days when on travel. This is the New Mexico version of the NYT – I don’t know if the obits published vary by region.)

@sciencemag 02018/06/29 highlights

This article kicks off a new organizing threat “Tomorrow’s Earth” with an optimistic and correct editorial.  Pointing out that 50 years ago Hardin published the “Tragedy of the Commons” (in Science), Berg lays out that today’s challenges can be traced back to those identified by Hardin.  At that time, Donald Kennedy (then the editor) pointed out that the big question “is whether scientific evidence can successfully overcome social, economic, and political resistance.”  That is our challenge!  (As an example, the article “Enhanced photovoltage for inverted planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells” … )

Better understanding and communicating the history of our planet is key, and “Learning from past climatic changes” helps with this.  The letters section including a big piece on ingenuity, looking at “Education for the future” – my take away was that there are a large number of new demands on the education system, but I don’t see a decrease in many of the “old/traditional” demands.  This is a challenge for our schools and universities.

The psychology paper “Prevalence-induced concept change in human judgment” had an interesting conclusion that “social problems may seem intractable in part because reductions in their prevalence lead people to see [notice] more of them.”

@NYTimes obits: 90 males, 41 females

Today, July 6, there were 5 male and 0 female featured obituaries in the New York Times. Yesterday, July 5, there were 1 male and 1 female featured obituaries in the New York Times. Since I started tracking it here, that is 90 males featured and 41 females featured.

(I started tracking the obits here on May 14, but I’ve missed days when on travel. This is the New Mexico version of the NYT – I don’t know if the obits published vary by region.)